Interactive Workshops November 2016 (1611) – Interior Design (it’s not just about kitchen design)

1611_workshops

It is tempting to think that if we covered the design of the kitchen, that would be enough. But also like to show you how you can use Vectorworks for creating more of an interior design that showed details of the kitchen, how the kitchen connects to other rooms, demolition, and furniture. We would also like to use the three-dimensional models of our furniture to create the drawings.

We will be using Building Information Modelling principles. So as well is drawing the plan will also be drawing the three-dimensional parts of our design. This is what will allow us to create the drawings from the 3D model.

We will be looking at many aspects of Vectorworks, from simple concepts through to some of the new techniques in Vectorworks 2017.

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cadmovie_1607-15 – From 2D To BIM – Part 15

Conclusion – There is no doubt in my mind that using a Building Information Modelling workflow is by far the most productive way of creating drawings. As you can see from this manual, there are several speed advantages in building the 3D model. Initially, you might find that it is slightly slower as you learn to use walls, doors, windows, slabs, and other BIM objects, but as you use these more often, you will speed up to the point that it is just as quick to draw these objects as it is to draw them any other way e.g. 2D objects like rectangles.

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cadmovie_1607-14 – From 2D To BIM – Part 14

Creating A Detail – Vectorworks has the ability to link viewports to detail references. This will allow you to create a detail reference in one location and link it to a viewport in a different location. When you update the 3D model the section will update, and the detail will also update.

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cadmovie_1607-13 – From 2D To BIM – Part 13

Creating A Section – It is now time to complete the drawings. If you are used to a 2D only workflow, you may not be used to using viewports and sheet layers to create your drawings. We have already set up one sheet layer and created several viewports but these might not be enough to fully describe the project. In this case we may need to create more viewports such as a section or a construction detail. If you are used to working with layers and viewports, then you will already know that we need to annotate these viewports adding notes, labels, and dimensions.

 

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cadmovie_1607-12 – From 2D To BIM – Part 12

Adding Furniture – Vectorworks comes with several furniture objects that you could use to populate your design. For this example I am only going to place a table and chairs, but you may want to place other furniture objects such as base cabinets, utility cabinets, handrails, et cetera.

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cadmovie_1607-11 – From 2D To BIM – Part 11

Adding Additional Walls – I keep coming back to it, as one of the key features of this way of drawing is the ability to update the design layer and see the changes on the viewports. At this point you may have had a discussion with your client or you may have looked at the design so far, and you realise that in order to use this area effectively, some additional screen walls are required.

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cadmovie_1607-09 – From 2D To BIM – Part 9

Creating A Title Block – Now that we have arranged the viewports on a sheet layer, we can add a title block. There are two tools that we can use for this: Sheet Border or VAA Title Block. If you are using the NZ/Aust version of Vectorworks, use the VAA Title Block. If you are using the international version of Vectorworks, use the Sheet Border tool.

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cadmovie_1607-07 – From 2D To BIM – Part 7

Creating Drawings – Now that we have some of the information, we can create drawings using viewports and sheet layers to show the live elevation from our model. You do not have to wait until the model is complete before you create your drawings.

Viewports let you take a view of the model and turn it into a 2D Drawing. For this project, we need to create a plan view, a front elevation, a side elevation, and an isometric view. You could create all of the viewports individually, but there is a quicker way. This command is not available in all versions of Vectorworks, so check your workspace for it.

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cadmovie_1607-06 – From 2D To BIM – Part 6

Creating Roof Framing – We have a tool that will allow us to create roof framing, it’s called the Framing Member. If you are using the Fundamentals workspace change back to your professional workspace where you will find the Framing Member Tool on the Detailing toolset.

Not only will this tool create a 2D and 3D version of a framing object, it can also be used to create a takeoff report. In other words, this is a BIM object that has 2D, 3D, and information attached to it.

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cadmovie_1607-04 – From 2D To BIM – Part 4

Creating The Walls – Many of our projects need walls. This is obvious for architects but many landscape projects also use walls as well. If we use the walls correctly we can get the 2D view of the project that we require, and we can also get the 3D part of the wall with very little effort. In this manual we will not be using complex wall styles (although these make the 3D modelling even quicker).

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cadmovie_1607-03 – From 2D To BIM – Part 3

 Setting Up The Layers – As we are going to create a 3D drawing it will be substantially easier if we create and set up our layers correctly for this project. This is one area where some users think that Vectorworks is too complex. If you find this area complex, then it will pay to spend some extra time understanding these concepts. Using layers correctly will really speed up your designs.

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cadmovie_1607-01 – From 2D To BIM – Part 1

Introduction  I have taught many Vectorworks users who think that 2D is the easy part of Vectorworks and 3D only comes into play as an added luxury:

“I want to get 2D under my belt first, then look at 3D.”

This is a complete misunderstanding of the way that Vectorworks creates drawings. 3D is not a luxury, it is an intrinsic part of the modelling/drawing process. If you use Vectorworks effectively, the 3D parts are easy to create, they will create your drawings, and when you update the model, it will be easy to update the plans, sections, and elevations.

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Interactive Workshops July 2016 (1607) – From 2D Drawing To BIM

Cover ImageJust lately, I have been teaching several users who want to move from using a workflow to using Building Information Modelling (3D workflow). In the past, I had several users who would say “I want to get to the under my belt first then look at 3D.” This suggests that 2D is a productive method and that 3D is a luxury. This completely misunderstands the way Vectorworks creates drawings. 3D is not a luxury, it is an intrinsic part of the modelling/drawing process.
When you use Vectorworks effectively the 3D components are easy to create, they will create your drawings, and when you update the model it will update your plans, sections, and elevations. Not only is this fast and easy, it also saves lots of errors.

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SST_1607 – From 2D Drawing To BIM

Cover ImageJust lately, I have been teaching several users who want to move from using a workflow to using Building Information Modelling (3D workflow). In the past, I had several users who would say “I want to get to the under my belt first then look at 3D.” This suggests that 2D is a productive method and that 3D is a luxury. This completely misunderstands the way Vectorworks creates drawings. 3D is not a luxury, it is an intrinsic part of the modelling/drawing process.
When you use Vectorworks effectively the 3D components are easy to create, they will create your drawings, and when you update the model it will update your plans, sections, and elevations. Not only is this fast and easy, it also saves lots of errors.

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Symbols and BIM

Symbols are excellent for using with Building Information Modeling. They can be created so that they have the 2D part, the 3D part, and the information that you require.

You can use classes to control the 2D and 3D portions of the symbol, so that the symbol can appear differently in various viewports.

 

Tools That Speed you from 2D to 3D – The Wall Tool

imageThe Wall Tool is one of the most important tools to speed up your drawing from 2D to 3D, regardless of your profession. If you set up design layers correctly, the wall tool will give 3D for free. But that is only the start of what you can do with walls. Walls make it easy to draw complex plans, you can assign the wall components to classes (allowing you to create several viewports of the same walls that show different information), you can add data to the wall (and the wall has a lot of data already), and the wall is created in 3D (with different elevations for each component).

I have heard of some users that use lines to draw walls, and some users that use rectangles. But this is inefficient. When you draw using walls, it is easy to insert doors and windows (they will create the correct wall opening in the wall for you), they are easy to join together (there are joining tools), and when you move a wall, all the connected walls extend automatically (saving time).

We will be covering walls in the July workshop (book here) and manual (SST_1607).