Interactive Workshops July 2016 (1607) – From 2D Drawing To BIM

Cover ImageJust lately, I have been teaching several users who want to move from using a workflow to using Building Information Modelling (3D workflow). In the past, I had several users who would say “I want to get to the under my belt first then look at 3D.” This suggests that 2D is a productive method and that 3D is a luxury. This completely misunderstands the way Vectorworks creates drawings. 3D is not a luxury, it is an intrinsic part of the modelling/drawing process.
When you use Vectorworks effectively the 3D components are easy to create, they will create your drawings, and when you update the model it will update your plans, sections, and elevations. Not only is this fast and easy, it also saves lots of errors.

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SST_1607 – From 2D Drawing To BIM

Cover ImageJust lately, I have been teaching several users who want to move from using a workflow to using Building Information Modelling (3D workflow). In the past, I had several users who would say “I want to get to the under my belt first then look at 3D.” This suggests that 2D is a productive method and that 3D is a luxury. This completely misunderstands the way Vectorworks creates drawings. 3D is not a luxury, it is an intrinsic part of the modelling/drawing process.
When you use Vectorworks effectively the 3D components are easy to create, they will create your drawings, and when you update the model it will update your plans, sections, and elevations. Not only is this fast and easy, it also saves lots of errors.

Continue reading

Symbols and BIM

Symbols are excellent for using with Building Information Modeling. They can be created so that they have the 2D part, the 3D part, and the information that you require.

You can use classes to control the 2D and 3D portions of the symbol, so that the symbol can appear differently in various viewports.

 

Tools That Speed you from 2D to 3D – The Wall Tool

imageThe Wall Tool is one of the most important tools to speed up your drawing from 2D to 3D, regardless of your profession. If you set up design layers correctly, the wall tool will give 3D for free. But that is only the start of what you can do with walls. Walls make it easy to draw complex plans, you can assign the wall components to classes (allowing you to create several viewports of the same walls that show different information), you can add data to the wall (and the wall has a lot of data already), and the wall is created in 3D (with different elevations for each component).

I have heard of some users that use lines to draw walls, and some users that use rectangles. But this is inefficient. When you draw using walls, it is easy to insert doors and windows (they will create the correct wall opening in the wall for you), they are easy to join together (there are joining tools), and when you move a wall, all the connected walls extend automatically (saving time).

We will be covering walls in the July workshop (book here) and manual (SST_1607).

How to Draw a Detail

Creating 3D models is the fun part of Vectorworks, but contract documentation is the longest part. In most countries contract documentation accounts for 45-50% of the architectural fee. This makes it the single biggest part of the project.

You can can use the BIM principles to speed up the creation of Plans, Sections, Elevations, and you can use it to help create details, but you still need to create many details that are not generated from the 3D model.

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Why You Should Draw In 3D, Using BIM

Why draw in 3D (BIM)? I often hear people say that I will learn the 2D first and then I’ll think about the 3D. The reality is that if you start by learning to use Buildling Information Modeling, as you build your models, you will also be creating your drawings. If the model changes, you can update the drawings with a click. You could call this an introduction to BIM.

I recently saw several customers that are using 2D only for their contract documentation. Some were not using viewports and none of them were using worksheets. Vectorworks has a fantastic ability to attach information to objects and report this information.

I truely believe that building the model seems harder, but the drawings are much quicker to create, and if you have to make any changes, the drawings are much, much quicker to update.

My workshop manual and webinar topic for July is how to make this transition from 2D to 3D. If you are a subscriber, book now…

 

Vectorworks Tip 439 – Creating a Curved Roof

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I used to create a curve roof using several components (roof face, extrusion, roof face). Recently, I’ve been using another technique to create my curve roof. The first step is to create a polyline with the inside shape that you want. This makes it easy to create the correct curve for your roof.
The next step is to extrude that polyline to the required length. Now you have a 3-D object you can use the shell solid tool to give this object to thickness. Now that you have required roof, you can use the Fit Walls to Objects… command to get your walls to fit to this curve roof.

Vectorworks Tip 437 –  Creating A Viewport That Fades Out

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I saw on the tech board, somebody was asking for a technique that would allow the viewport to fade out. I think you can achieve this now if you put an object in your viewport with a transparent gradient. In the image you can see I created a gradient that changes from solid white to transparent. I used the attribute mapping tool to control where the transparent and solid parts are, and I also used the attributes palette to change the gradient from a linear gradient to a radial gradient.

Vectorworks Tip 436 – Creating a Curved Stair

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In this example I’m using the Circular Stair tool (remember this is part of the legacy tools that you will have to add to your workspace). Like the simple stair, the curve stair allows you to create a quick curving stair, which I find is useful for concept drawings where you do not want focus too much on the detail. The Object Info palette has all of the options that you need for the stair.

Vectorworks Tip 434 – How to Edit A Symbol

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There are several ways that you can edit a symbol. You can right click on the symbol on the drawing area, you can right click on the symbol in the Resource Manager, or you can double-click on the symbol. Choose which part of the symbol you want to edit (2-D, 3-D, wall hole component, or symbol options). Remember the changes you make to a symbol will affect all instances of the symbol and the entire drawing.

Vectorworks Tip 430 – Creating a Left Stair With the Simple Stair Tool

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Unlike other stair tools, the simple stair has all of its options on the Object Info palette. This makes it extremely quick to make the changes to the stair. In order to create a left stair, you can choose this option from the Object Info palette.

Vectorworks Tip 426 – Creating a Straight Stair With the Simple Stair Tool

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For concept design, I think the simple stair takes a lot of beating. It’s easy to use, it’s very quick to use, and it gives you some pleasing results without too much bother with settings. Because it is a simple stair, you have very limited graphic and handrail abilities, but remember the conceptual design, you don’t want to have too many options.

Vectorworks Tip 423 – Cool Tricks With Symbols 3 – Records

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Some objects in Vectorworks already have information attached to them. Symbols allow you to attach your own information to them using record formats. This allows you to create a symbol that has your own specific information attached and this information can also link to text and the symbol so that when you update the information on the Object Info palette the text and the symbol will also update. I am covering this at the design summit in Chicago, so you might still have time to come in join my session.

 

Vectorworks Tip 419 – Cool tricks with symbols 2 – Auto Class

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The next amazing track with symbols is the ability to control what class the symbol will be assigned to. For example, whenever I use a symbol for a lighting switch, it is always assigned to the class that I require (services – electrical), regardless of the active class on the view bar. This means that I can activate my symbol and not have to worry about what my active classes, the object will automatically be assigned to the correct class. This dramatically improves my productivity because my objects are automatically assigned to their required classes. I will be looking at using symbols to create and manage your libraries at the design summit in Chicago

Vectorworks Tip 418 – Creating a Dog-Leg Stair With The Custom Stair Tool

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Remember that the custom stair tool is designed to be used as a kit of parts. This means that to create a dogleg stair we need three parts: a straight flight, a U-Landing, and a straight flight for the final part of the stair. Once you understand that the stair uses a kit of parts, it becomes much easier to create the stair that you want.

Vectorworks Tip 415 – Cool tricks with symbols-1

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The first trick with symbols is that you can control their insertion point. If you would rather use groups you will find that you cannot control the insertion point of the group. For example if I create a symbol for furniture, I can choose where the insertion point of that furniture might be. For a bed, it might be the centre of the bed head. For a table and chairs, it might be the centre of the table. If I’m using a symbol for electrical switches, I might set the insertion point an inch off the switch so that my switch appears to hover just off the wall. Creating suitable insertion points for your symbols dramatically improves your productivity. I will be looking at using symbols to create and manage your libraries at the design summit in Chicago

Detailing Basics – Pressure Differential

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Detailing Basics – Pressure Differential. Pressure Differential is the difference in pressure between the inside and outside. If the pressure difference is great, water can be drawn up vertical faces, through gaps, and into the building. The solution is to have air seals at all joints.